Katy Asian Town Shopping Center to Open New Restaurants in May

Courtesy Josie Lin

KATY (Covering Katy News)—Two restaurants have opened at the new Katy Asian Town shopping center, with more expected to open by the end of next month, the broker representing the development said.

The two restaurants are Yummy Pho & Bo Ne, which serves Vietnamese food, and Square Root Poké, which serves Poké (rhymes with okay), a Hawaiian delicacy, Josie Lin of RE/MAX United of Houston said.

Groundbreaking took place in January 2016, with the buildings becoming ready in December, Lin said. Some internal work, such as electrical configuration work, continues to proceed.

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The buildings are ready, she said, providing that a prospective business has the appropriate permits from Harris County. Katy Asian Town is in Harris County but is not in the City of Katy. It is located on the east side of the Grand Parkway, just north of the Katy Freeway.

In addition to the other stores set to open by the end of May, Lin’s own office will have a May 9 grand opening at the shopping center.

The shopping center, which is approximately 100,000 square feet, will be anchored by H Mart, a popular Asian grocery store chain. The Katy Asian Town store will be the third H Mart in the Houston area.

Like many construction projects in the Katy area, Hurricane Harvey had an impact on the construction work. But Lin said construction crews worked to put the project back on track.

“We’re still in good shape,” Lin said.

The shopping center is expected to draw students and staff from a University of Houston System campus that is being built nearby.

Lin described the project as an Asian real estate platform, with restaurants, and a grocery store that will provide a taste of Asia.

“It’s more than just Chinese,” Lin said. “It’s Japanese, Malaysian, and Vietnamese.”

Lin said she is often asked whether Katy Asian Town is in competition with the Chinatown area in southwest Houston. She said that Katy Asian Town is a supplement to, and not a competitor of, the Houston Chinatown.

Courtesy Josie Lin